Ammonia Leak Detecting Cloth

This 1 m2 cloth (40x40") is sensitive to ammonia (NH3) gas, & can be used for leak detection & air tightness testing of glove boxes, etc.; only $89.95.

The reaction is reversible so that the cloth can be reused many times before needing replacement.

Check the Related Products section below for magnifiers that might be useful for finding small holes indicated by the leak detection cloth.



Related Products

Availability: Out of Stock
SKU: 33820-BTB/L
Ammonia Leak Detector Cloth - 40x40" (1x1m)

PRICE BREAKS - The more you buy, the more you save.
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Price for each$84.95USD$83.95USD$82.95USD$79.95USD
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Ammonia has uses as a refrigerant & for leak detection techniques but it is also used in water treatment. Some municipalities use it to react with chlorine to produce choramines. These have a lower overall disinfection strength but last much longer.


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Exposed Leak Detector Cloth, Isolator Leak Detector Cloth,

The following excerpt is taken from a paper: 

1)      Coles, Tim (2012).  Leak Rate Measurement for Pharmaceutical Isolators:  Practical Guidance for Operators and Test Engineers.  Clean Air and Containment Review Issue 11, pages 8-12.

"Ammonia provides an excellent method for leak detection. It is sensitive, inexpensive and will trace small leaks with absolute repeatability. To carry out this test, a bottle of around 50 ml of ammonia solution is placed inside the isolator together with a pad of lint-free wipers and a polyethylene bag. The isolator is sealed up and using the gloves, the ammonia is poured out onto the wipers to disperse through the isolator volume. The isolator is then raised to perhaps 100 Pa pressure and proprietary bromophenol cloth is applied to the seals and joints of the isolator. Where ammonia escapes, the cloth turns from yellow to blue. At the end of the test the wipers are placed in the plastic bag and the isolator is ventilated, ideally to atmosphere. Ammonia is of course pungent, but the quantities used are small and the real hazards are small. This method is highly recommended to isolator users."

You can download this reference paper on leak detection which discusses much of the theory & different methods for conducting accurate leakage rate measurements.